The 84th Indiana Infantry

The 84th Volunteer Infantry Regiment of Indiana – Roster and Detailed History


The 84th Regiment – Company “F” Roster:

COLONEL.

Nelson Trusler, Connersville. Mustered in September -5, 1862. Resigned October 17, 1863.

Andrew J. Neff, Winchester. Commissioned December 11, 1863. Not mustered. Resigned as Lieutenant Colonel, October 17, 1864.

Martin B. Miller, Winchester. Commissioned June 1, 1865. Not mustered. Mustered out as Lieutenant Colonel, June 14, 1865.

LIEUTEANANT COLONEL.

Samuel Orr, Muncie. Mustered in September 8, 1862. Resigned December 9, 1863.

Andrew J. Neff. Winchester. Mustered in March 16, 1864. Promoted Colonel.

William A. Boyd, Centreville. Commissioned December 11, 1863. Not mustered. Died as Major, July 11, 1864, account of wounds in Atlanta Campaign.

John C. Taylor, Muncie. Mustered in December 26, 1864. Resigned March 12, 1865.

Martin B. Miller, Winchester. Mustered in April 25, 1865. Promoted Colonel.

George U. Carter, Winchester. Commissioned June 1, 1865. Not mustered. Mustered out as Major, June 14, 1865.

MAJOR

Andrew J. Neff. Winchester. Mustered in September 5, 1862. Promoted Lieutenant Colonel.

William A. Boyd, Centreville. Mustered in March 16, 1864. Promoted Lieutenant Colonel.

John C. Taylor, Muncie. Mustered in October 11, 1864. Promoted Lieutenant Colonel.

Martin B. Miller, Winchester. Mustered in December 26, 1864. Promoted Lieutenant Colonel.

George U. Carter, Winchester. Mustered in April 25. 1865. Promoted Lieutenant Colonel.

Robert M. Grubbs, Knightstown. Commissioned June 1, 1865. Not mustered. Mustered out as Captain, Company F, June 14, 1865.

LIEUTENANT AND ADJUTANT.

Lee Roy Wood, Centreville. Mustered in September 5, 1862. Resigned November 9, 1862.

Lycurgus L. Bbblett, Knightstown. Mustered in December 4, 1862. Resigned September 28, 1864.

Ebenezer T. Chaffee, Winchester. Mustered in December 26, 1864. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

LIEUTENANT AND QUARTERMASTER.

William M. Jarrell, Liberty. Mustered in August 17, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

CAPTAIN AND CHAPLAIN.

Silas F. stout, Connersville. Mustered in October 10, 1862. Resigned July 31, 1863

Thomas Addington, Winchester. Mustered in January 22, 1864. Resigned March 15, 1864.

MAJOR AND SURGEON.

Samuel S. Boyd, Dublin. Mustered in December 31, 1862, Resigned March 23, 1865

Henry Kirby, Granville. Mustered in April 24, 1865, Mustered out June 14, 1865

ASSISTANT SURGEONS.

Ziba Casterline, Liberty. Mustered in August 15, 1862. Resigned July 31, 1863.

Henry Kirby, Granville. Mustered in November 22, 1862. Promoted Surgeon.

Robert P. Davis, Portland. Mustered in April 24, 1865. Resigned May 17, 1865.

Isaac F. Sweeny, Milton. Commissioned June 1, 1865. Not mustered. Mustered: out as Hospital Steward, June 14, 1865.

COMPANY F.

CAPTIAN

Robert M. Grubbs, Knightstown. Mustered in September 3, 1862. Promoted Major.

Joshua T. C. Welborn, Knightstown. Commissioned June 1, 1865. Not mustered. Mustered out as First Lieutenant, June 14, 1865.

FIRST LIEUTENANT.

Valentine Steiner, Knightstown. Mustered in September 3, 1862: Honorably discharged January 25, 1864, account of wounds at Chickamiauga, Georgia, September 19, 1863.

Joshua T. C. Welborn, Knightstown. Mustered in March 21, 1864. Promoted Captain.

William M. Cameron, Knightstown. Commissioned June 1, 1865. Not mustered. Mustered out as First Sergeant, June 14, 1865.

SECOND LIEUTENANT.

Jerome B. Mason, Knightstown. Mustered in September 3, 1862. Killed at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863.

Alpheus Green, Knightstown. Commissioned June 1. 1865. Not mustered. Mustered out as Sergeant, June 14, 1865.

FIRST SERGEANT.

Joshua T. C. Welborn. Knightstown. Mustered in August 8, 1862. Promoted First Lieutenant

SERGEANTS.

William M. Cameron, Knightstown. Mustered in August 22, 1862. Appointed First Sergeant. Promoted First Lieutenant.

Henry H. Haper, Knightstown. Mustered in August 8, 1862. Discharged, disability, January 4, 1863.

James Tinney, Knightstown. Mustered in August 12, 1882. Discharged July 30, 1864. account of wounds at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 30, 1863.

Alpheus Green, Knightstown. Mustered in August 11, 1862. Promoted Second Lieutenant.

CORPORALS.

Isaac P. Smith, Knightstown. Mustered in August 19, 1862. Appointed Sergeant. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

John W. C. Power, Knightstown. Mustered in August 11, 1862. Died August 15, 1864, account of wounds before Atlanta, Georgia, August 11, 1864.

Cyrus H. Alexander, Knightstown. Mustered in July 25, 1862. Discharged, disability, June 16, 1863.

William B. Miller. Knightstown. Mustered in August 13. 1862. Mustered out August 21, 1865.

Robert W. Mason, Ogden. Mustered in August 21, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Isaac H. Morris, Knightstown. Mustered in August 9, 1862. Appointed Sergeant. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

John W. Allee, Knightstown. Mustered in July 30, 1862. Killed at Kenesaw mountain, Georgia, June 23, 1864.

Joseph M. Byers, Knightstown. Mustered in August 6. 1862. Appointed Sergeant. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

MUSICIANS.

Gustave W. Leweck, Knightstown. Mustered in August 21, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

David A. Mason, Knightstown. Mustered in August 26, 1862. Mustered out June 14. 1865.

WAGONER.

Ezra Troxell. Knightstown. Mustered in August 22, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

PRIVATES.

William H. Albright, Knightstown. Mustered in August 8, 1862. Discharged, disability. April 25, 1863.

John M. Anderson, Knightstown. Mustered in August 6, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Jonathan Baldwin, Ogden. Mustered in September 21, 1864. Recruit. Mustered out August 4, 1865.

Benjamin Beaty, Knightstown. Mustered in August 21, 1862. Died at Franklin, Tennessee, February 25, 1863.

Cornelius Beck, Knightstown. Mustered in August 9, 1862. Died at Chattanooga, Tennessee. July 11, 1864, account of wounds in Atlanta Campaign, June 23, 1864.

Issom Beck, Knightstown. Mustered in August 9, 1862. Killed at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863.

Samuel H. Beck, Knightstown. Mustered in August 8, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

David W. Berry, Knightstown. Mustered in August 6, 1862. Discharged, disability. April 25, 1863.

Lycurgus L. Bobiett. Knightstown. Mustered in August 10. 1862. Promoted Adjutant.

Harmon Boran. Knightstown. Mustered in August 13, 1862. Died at Franklin, Tennessee, February 25, 1863.

George Bradford, Knightstown. Mustered in August 14, 1862. Discharged, disability, July 9, 1863.

Daniel Burris, Knightstown. Mustered in August 12, 1862. Discharged, disability, April 8, 1864.

Henry J. Burris, Knightstown. Mustered in August 13, 1862. Discharged, disability, January 4, 1863.

Amos Butler, Knightstown. Mustered in August 28, 1862. Died at Franklin, Tennessee, April 22, 1863.

John T. Byers, Knightstown. Mustered in August 6, 1862. Died near Chattanooga, Tennessee, October 8, 1863.

Samuel T. Byers, Knightstown. Mustered in August 6, 1862. Died near Chattanooga, Tennessee, date unknown.

Isaiah Byrket, Knightstown. Mustered in August 21, 1862. Died at home, near Knightstown, Indiana, June 1, 1863.

Jacob Byrket, Knightstown. Mustered in August 27, 1862. Discharged, disability, December 22, 1863.

Richard P. Cooper, Wayne County. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Albert T. Davis, Knightstown. Mustered in August 17, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Andrew J. Debord, Coffin’s Station. Mustered in August 6, 1862. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, March 27, 1865.

Joseph R. Dennis, Knightstown. Mustered in August 10, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

James I. Dent, Raysville. Mustered in August 13, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Eli H. Dillee, Knightstown. Mustered in August 11, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

George W. Doran, Ogden. Mustered in August 30, 1862. Transferred to Company C, Engineer Corps, July 29, 1864. Mustered out June 26, 1865.

Jabez Elliott, Knightstown. Mustered in August 22, 1862. Discharged, disability,March 4, 1863.

William P. Elmore, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Amos Farmer, Knightstown. Mustered in September 1, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Christopher C. Freeman, Knightstown. Mustered in August 11, 1862. Discharged, disability, December 20. 1862.

William J. Griggsby, Knightstown. Mustered in August 7, 1862. Missing November 12, 1863.

Thomas M. Hackleman, Knightstown. Mustered in July 25, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Henry C. Hall, Knightstown. Mustered in January 6, 1864. Recruit. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, August 26, 1864.

Abyram Harrold, Ogden. Mustered in August 10, 1862. Mustered out May 20,1865.

Isaac N. Hasten, Knightstown. Mustered in January 6, 1864. Recruit. Transferred to Company K, 57th Regiment.

Thomas G. Hill, Knightstown. Mustered in August 28, 1862. Discharged, disability, August 25, 1863.

Jonathan D. Holloway, Knightstown. Mustered in August 10, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

George Hubbard, Raysville Mustered in August 9, 1862. Appointed Corporal. (Company C.) Mustered out June 14. 1865.

Alexander Johnson, Knightstown. Mustered in January 6, 1864. Recruit. Transferred to Company K, 57th Regiment.

Samuel Keal, Knightstown. Mustered in August 10, 1862. Missing January 5, 1863.

Isaac R. R. Leakey, Knightstown. Mustered in August 14, 1862. Missing January 16, 1863.

George Lockridge, Knightstown. Mustered in August 14, 1862. Died at Franklin, Tennessee, May 25, 1863.

Edward L. McLaughlin. Knightstown. Mustered in August 11, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

William Madison, Knightstown. Mustered in August 14, 1862. Discharged, disability, December 22, 1863.

Jefferson Martin, Knightstown. Mustered in August 6, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

John H. May, Knightstown. Mustered in July 28, 1862 . Mustered out June 14, 1865.

James Miller, Knightstown. Mustered in August 6, 1862. Wounded at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Sylvester Miller, Knightstown. Mustered in August 6, 1862. Mustered out June 14,1865.

Amos D. Murphey, Knightstown. Mustered in August 13, 1862. Transferred to Company K, 57th Regiment.

Henry F. Newby Ogden. Mustered in August 11, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Cornelius O’Bannion, Knightstown. Mustered in August 14, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Joseph O’Bannion, Knightstown. Mustered in August 14, 1862. Discharged, disability, February 28, 1865.

Charles W. Overman, Knightstown. Mustered in August 14, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Wounded at Nashville, Tennessee, December 16, 1864. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

William A. Pickett, Knightstown. Mustered in August 12. 1862. Died at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, December 16, 1862.

Joseph A. Pierce, Knightstown. Mustered in August 6, 1862. Mustered out June 4,1865.

Argyle A. Poston, Knightstown. Mustered in August 21, 1862. Died at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, April 14, 1863.

Elam Rich. Randolph County. Mustered in September 1, 1862. Mustered out June 16, 1865.

Winfield S. Settle, Millville. Mustered in January 26, 1864. Recruit. Transferred to Company K, 57th Regiment;

Absalom J. Simpson, Knightstown. Mustered in August 10, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

John H. Smith, Ogden. Mustered in August 10, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

John P. Smith, Knightstown. Mustered in August 8. 1862. Discharged, disability May 6, 1863.

William G. Stamm, Ogden. Mustered in August 11, 1862. Mustered out May 23,1865.

Elijah H. Stewart, Knightstown. Mustered in August 11, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

James S. Stewart, Knightstown. Mustered in August 11, 1862. Discharged, disability, August 25, 1863.

Samuel L. Stewart, Knightstown. Mustered in January 6, 1864. Recruit. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, May 4, 1865.

William W. Stewart, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

Albert Stratton, Knightstown. Mustered in August 8. 1862. Mustered out June 14,1865.

George Temple, Knightstown. Mustered in August 21, 1862. Mustered out June 14,1865.

Edward Thawley, Raysville, Mustered in August 29, 1862. Transferred to Company E, Engineer Corps, July 29, 1864. Mustered out June 24, 1865.

James W. Tribby, Knightstown. Mustered in August. 10, 1862. Transferred to Company K, 57th Regiment.

Robert Troxell, Knightstown. Mustered in August 21, 1862. Killed at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863.

George D. Walker, Knightstown. Mustered in August 21, 1862. Missing January 16, 1863.

Daniel L. Watkins, Knightstown. Mustered in August 9, 1862. Died in West Virginia, October 17, 1862.

Rufus A. Wilkinson, Knightstown. Mustered in August 13, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

James A. Wineberg, Wayne County. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 14, 1865.

John A. Wink, Knightstown. Mustered in August 21. 1862. Discharged, disability, March 14, 1863.


A Detailed History of the 84th Indiana Infantry Volunteer Regiment:


The Eighty Fourth Regiment, Indiana Infantry, was organized at Richmond, and mustered into the service of the United States September 3, 1862, with Nelson Trusler as Colonel. On the 8th of September it was sent to Covington, Kentucky, and upon its arrival there was assigned to the defenses of Covington and Cincinnati, Ohio, then threatened by the invasion of the army of the Confederate General, Kirby Smith. This regiment remained at Covington until October 1st, when it was sent to Western Virginia, and upon its arrival in that State went into camp at Point Pleasant, where it remained until the 13th of October, when it was sent to Guyandotte. At this latter place the regiment remained employed in scouting duty until the 14th of November. On the 14th of November, 1862, the regiment was ordered to Catlettsburg, Kentucky, and after a short stay at that place was moved to Cassville, Kentucky, where it remained until the 7th of February, 1863. On the 7th of February the regiment was sent to Catlettsburg, placed on board a steamer and sent down the Ohio River to Louisville, where it was assigned to the Second Brigade, Third Division, Army of the Ohio. The regiment was then sent to Nashville, Tennessee, and remained in camp at Nashville until March 5, 1863. From thence it was sent to Franklin, Tennessee, remaining until the first part of June. During the time of its encampment at Franklin, it took part in several reconnaissance missions and skirmishes.

On the 3d of June it marched with its division to Triune, Tennessee, and on the 8th of June was assigned to the First Brigade, First Division, Reserve Corps, commanded by Major General Gordon Granger. On the 12th of June, 1863, the Confederates made an attack upon Triune and were repulsed, the Eighty Fourth Indiana taking an active part in the engagement. On June 23d the regiment, with its brigade, left Triune and marched in pursuit of the enemy. The command marched to Middleton, then to Shelbyville, thence to Wartrace, where it went into camp and remained until August 12th. While stationed at this point Brigadier General Whitaker was assigned to the command of the brigade to which this regiment was attached.

On the 20th of August the regiment, with its brigade, moved to Tullahoma, thence joined with General Rosecrans’ Army on the Chattanooga-Chickamauga campaign. The regiment reached Chattanooga September 13th and went into camp at Rossville, some four miles south of Chattanooga, and there remained until the opening of the battle of Chickamauga, September i8th. On September i8th it moved with its brigade and division, in command of Brigadier General Steedman, to the front, and took position on the left of the line of the Army of the Cumberland at and about the McAfee Church. It remained at and about the McAfee Church until near noon of September 20th when it moved, with its division to the battlefield and was actively engaged in the battle during the remainder of that day, to the close of the battle. It retired from the battlefield on the night of September 20th and returned to its old camp at Rossville, and on the morning of the 21st moved back to Chattanooga, crossed the Tennessee River, and went on duty with Whitaker’s Brigade opposite the point of Lookout Mountain, remaining in this position for about nine days, during which time it was constantly engaged in skirmishes with the enemy across the river. The regiment was then moved to Moccasin Point, opposite Lookout Mountain, where it remained until the 1st of November. It was then sent to Shell Mound, where it remained in camp until the 26th of January, 1864 as one of the outposts of the army.

On the reorganization of the army after the battle of Chickamauga, the Eighty Fourth was assigned to the Second Brigade (Brigadier General Whitaker commanding). First Division (Brigadier General Charles Craft commanding). Fourth Army Corps (Major General Gordon Granger commanding).
The regiment on the 26th of January was marched to Cleveland, Tennessee, and remained at that point until February 22d, when it joined in a reconnaissance to Buzzard Roost, Georgia, and was engaged in the battle at that place on February 25th, 1864. The regiment then returned to Cleveland and remained in camp at that place until the 3rd of May, 1864. It then joined with General Sherman’s Army on the Atlanta Campaign. During the Atlanta Campaign the regiment was engaged in action at Tunnel Hill, Rocky Face Ridge, Dalton, Resaca, Kingston, Pumpkin Vine Creek, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Gulp’s House, Peach Tree Creek, the Siege of Atlanta, Shoals Creek, Jonesboro, and Lovejoy Station.

After the battle of Lovejoy Station it returned with Sherman’s victorious army into Atlanta. On the 3rd of October the regiment was sent to Chattanooga from Atlanta, arriving at Chattanooga October 30th. From Chattanooga the regiment was sent to Athens, Alabama; from thence to Pulaski, Tennessee, and on the 23d of November marched to Columbia and took part in the engagement at Columbia and Spring Hill, and afterwards at Franklin, Tennessee, on November 30th. From Franklin the regiment marched with the army to Nashville and formed a part of General Thomas’ Army during the siege of Nashville by General Hood, and on the 16th of December took part in the second day’s battle at Nashville. In the afternoon of that day was in the general charge upon the enemy’s works, resulting in carrying the enemy’s entrenchments and driving Hood’s Army in confusion from the field. Joining in the pursuit of Hood, it marched as far as Huntsville, Alabama, reaching that place with the army on the 5th of January, 1865. On the 13th of March it was moved to Knoxville. Tennessee; from thence to Strawberry Plains, Bull’s gap and Shields’ Mills.

Upon the fall of Richmond and the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox, that portion of the army then in Eastern Tennessee was ordered to Nashville, arriving in Nashville April 23, 1865. While at Nashville this regiment took part in the final review of General Thomas’ Army, and on the 14th of June, 1865, the Eighty Fourth Regiment Indiana Infantry was mustered out of the United States service at Nashville, and returned to Indiana. The recruits that had joined the regiment after its organization, at the time of the muster-out of the regiment were transferred to the Fifty Seventh Indiana, and were sent to Texas, but were finally mustered out in November, 1865.

EIGHTY FOURTH INDIANA AT CHICKAMAUGA.

Just prior to and at the time of the battle of Chickamauga, the Eighty Fourth Indiana, under the command of Colonel Nelson Trusler, was attached to and formed a part of the First Brigade ( Whitaker’s) of First Division (Steedman’s), reserve Corps, commanded by Major General Gordon Granger.

On September 18, 1863, this brigade, then in camp near Rossville, Georgia, four miles south of Chattanooga, was ordered to move forward and occupy the bridge across the Chickamauga on the Rossville and Ringgold road, “if it could be done without bringing on a general engagement.” The movement was begun about four P.M. and had gone forward only about three miles in the direction of Ringgold, when the advance was fired on by the enemy and a skirmish at once ensued, with a slight loss to the skirmishers. Night prevented any further advance and put a stop to the fighting, and the brigade took up its position on the hills at the McAfee Church, and occupied that position during the night in quiet. On the morning of the 19th, Whitaker was ordered by General Granger to maintain his position at the McAfee Church. Soon after receiving the order to remain, Whitaker sent out a strong line of skirmishers from the Eighty Fourth Indiana to discover the enemy and to ascertain his strength. The skirmishers went under the command of Major Neff of this regiment with the remainder of the regiment held as a reserve within supporting distance. It did not require a long march and only a very short space of time to develop the enemy, and soon the skirmishers were occupied in a very spirited engagement with the pickets and skirmishers of the enemy, and driving them back on to the enemy’s camp and firing into the camp. The skirmishers developed the fact that the enemy had infantry, mounted infantry, cavalry and artillery, and were then occupying the south bank of the Chickamauga in considerable force.

Having accomplished the purpose for which they were sent — that of discovering the location and strength of the enemy— the skirmishers fell back to the supports and rested. About one p. m. the enemy made an attack in force upon the Eighty Fourth Indiana, and, notwithstanding the attack was made in strong force, the regiment held its position until re-enforcements arrived. The force of the enemy increasing in numbers, the line was slowly withdrawn to the remainder of the brigade, and a severe contest ensued, lasting from two p. m.to near five p. m. in all of which the Eighty Fourth Indiana took an active part.

That the situation may be fully understood, the location of the McAfee Church should be stated, and the conditions that confronted this regiment and Whitaker’s Brigade. At the time of the fighting by this command, it should be remembered that three miles south of the McAfee Church, at the same time that the Eighty Fourth Indiana was skirmishing, the battle at Chickamauga was raging from Jay’s Mill to the Brock field, and that, in the afternoon of that day, the battle lines had extended from the Brock field southward through the Brotherton woods to and including the terrible carnage on the Kelly field. General Bragg was at that very time attempting with his main army to get around General Rosecrans’ Army and secure possession of the Lafayette and Chattanooga road and separate the Union Army from Chattanooga. In pursuance of this plan of Bragg, a strong force of Forrest’s Cavalry, with several regiments of infantry, had been sent to the right of the Confederate Army from Ringgold to secure a hold on the road to Chattanooga, and it was a portion of this force that found Whitaker’s force blocking the way. Reenforcements were’ pushed forward to Whitaker by General Steedman, and the enemy was severely punished, and finally, about five p. m., was driven from the field. During the night of the 19th the lines were maintained at and about the McAfee Church. On the morning of the 20th the Reserve Corps of Granger was disposed as follows : Whitaker’s and Mitchell’s Brigades of Steedman’s Division, were at or about McAfee Church, and McCook’s Brigade of the Second Division of the Reserve Corps was moved to a point near to the church and posted in position to cover Ringgold road. General Granger joined this portion of his command at the McAfee Church, and was within hearing of the battle when it opened on General Rosecrans on Sunday morning, the 20th.

In the immediate front of Granger’s troops that morning everything was quiet, but General Granger reports that “large clouds of dust could be seen beyond our position, moving in the direction of the sound of battle.” The sound of the battle growing stronger “in volume and intensity” on the right of Granger, and he being convinced from the sound of the battle that the enemy was pushing Thomas hard, determined to go to his assistance. About eleven a.m. General Granger started with Whitaker’s and Mitchell’s Brigades, under the immediate command of General Steedman, their division commander, to Thomas’ assistance, leaving Colonel McCook with his brigade at the McAfee Church to keep the road to Rossvllle open. Just at the time General Granger made the start for the field the break in the Union lines occurred, and the battle fell away from the Brotherton house and the Poe field line to the “Horse Shoe Ridge,” as it was then called, but now known as the “Snodgrass Hill.’” From the McAfee Church to Snodgrass Hill it is by the shortest route about three and one-half miles. In this movement the Eighty Fourth Indiana was one of the regiments of Whitaker’s Brigade that marched to the assistance of Thomas. General Thomas, in his report, says it was sometime between two and three p. m. (although General Granger fixes the time at one p. m.) when General Steedman arrived on Thomas’ left flank at Harker’s Hill.

General Thomas at once sent an order to Steedman to push forward and take position on General Brannan’s right, then hard pressed by Longstreet’s forces on Snodgrass Hill, which order, General Thomas says, “was complied with the greatest promptness and alacrity.” General Whitaker with his brigade, was directed to drive the enemy from the bridge on the right of Brannan, which was with a heavy force of infantry and artillery then threatening the destruction of Brannan with a flank movement.

In Whitaker’s formation the Eighty Fourth Indiana was in the second line in the first charge made by him, but after he had driven the enemy about a half mile, re-enforcements were received by the Confederates, and they in turn drove Whitaker’s first line until it met the second, when all of Whitaker’s men came into the engagement, the Eighty Fourth with the others, and the enemy was again driven back with great loss.

General Whitaker’s Brigade proper — four regiments of infantry — went into the fight on Snodgrass Hill with 1,033 officers and men; the loss in killed and wounded was 595 officers and men and 32 missing, the missing supposed to have been wounded and taken by the enemy in the first charge. The Eighty Fourth Indiana went into the engagement with 374 officers and men; its loss was 120 killed and wounded and 13 missing. These figures of the killed and wounded show how well the regiment discharged its duty on that day.

General Granger, in his report of this engagement, says: “The gallant Steedman, seizing the colors of a regiment, led his men to the attack. With loud cheers they rushed upon the enemy, and after a terrific conflict, lasting but twenty minutes, drove them from the ground and occupied the ridge and gorge. The slaughter of both friend and foe was terrific. General Whitaker, while rushing forward at the head of his brigade, was knocked from his horse by a musket ball and was for a short time unfit for duty, while two of his staff were killed and two mortally wounded. General Steedman’s horse was killed and he was severely bruised, yet he remained on duty during the day.

This attack was made by our troops, very few of whom had ever been in an action before, against a division of old soldiers, who largely outnumbered them; yet with resolution and energy they drove the enemy from his strong position, occupied it themselves, and afterward held the ground they had gained with such terrible losses. The victory was dearly won, but to this army it was a priceless one. The staff officers of General Whitaker, killed and wounded, included all of his staff that were with him that day.

There was now a lull in the battle. It was of short duration, however, for within thirty minutes after we had gained possession of the ridge we were impetuously attacked by two divisions of Longstreet’s veterans. Again the enemy was driven back, and from this, time until dark the battle between these two opposing forces raged furiously. Our whole line was continually enveloped in smoke and fire. The assaults of the enemy were made with that energy which was inspired by the bright prospect of a speedy victory, and bv a consciousness that it was only necessary to carry this position and crush our forces to enable them to overthrow our army and drive it across the Tennessee River. Their forces were massed and hurled upon us for the purpose of terminating at once this great and bloody battle. But the stout hearts of the handful of men who stood before them as a wall of fire quailed not; they understood our perilous position and held their ground, determined to perish rather than yield it. Never had commander such just cause for congratulations over the action of his troops.”

General Granger, on arriving on the field in the afternoon, had divided his surplus ammunition, which he had brought in his ammunition train, with Wood and Brannan; now, upon the charge and repulse of the enemy, just before dark, the entire supply of ammunition was exhausted, even that which they had gathered from the cartridge boxes of their dead and wounded comrades was all gone, not a round was left. Of the perilous situation at this juncture General Granger says: ”All seemed to be lost if he should return to the contest. Anticipating another attack, I ordered the command to be given to the men to stand firm and to use the cold steel. After an ominous silence of a few minutes the enemy came rushing on again. With fixed bayonets our troops gallantly charged them and drove them back in confusion. Twice more were these charges repeated and the enemy driven back before darkness brought an end to the battle. Night came and the enemy fell back, whipped and discomfited.”

The troops that Steedman’s two brigades fought against at Snodgrass Hill were Hindman’s Division, composed of Anderson’s Brigade, with five regiments and a battalion of sharpshooters; “Deas” Brigade, with five regiments and a battalion of sharpshooters, Manigault’s Brigade, with five regiments, and with three batteries of artillery.

General Thomas, in his report of the battle on Snodgrass Hill, tells of Steedman’s troops thus: “Steedman. moving his division into position with almost as much precision as if on drill, and fighting his way to the crest of the hill on Brannan’s right, moved forward his artillery and drove the enemy down the southern slope, inflicting on him a most terrible loss in killed and wounded. This opportune arrival of fresh troops revived the flagging spirits of our men on the right, and inspired them with new ardor for the contest. Every assault of the enemy, from that time until nightfall, was repulsed in the most gallant style by the whole line.”

The Eighty Fourth Indiana won imperishable renown at Snodgrass Hill,.
Sunday afternoon, September 20, 1863. The State of Indiana has sought to perpetuate the name and fame of this regiment on Snodgrass Hill with a monument of Indiana stone and bronze, at the point where it did its hard fighting, a little south of west of the Tower. On the tablet is the story of the regiment on that day, as follows:

INDIANA’S TRIBUTE TO THE EIGHTY FOURTH REGIMENT INFANTRY.

Colonel Nelson Trusler, Commanding.
First Brigade, ( Whitaker).
First Division (Steedman).
Reserve Corps (Granger).

September i8th, this regiment was engaged on the extreme left of the army near Ringgold Bridge, and on the morning of the 19th was stationed on the hills near McAfee’s Church. Skirmished with the enemy until one p. m., when he attacked in large force, and severe fighting was kept up until five p. m., when the enemy drew off.

September 20th, still in position near McAfee’s Church, until about twelve p.m., when the regiment marched to the sound of the firing at Snodgrass Hill, arriving at this point about two thirty p. m., and engaged in the charge and desperate combat which took place here, assisting in driving back the enemy and saving; the “right”.
Loss: Killed, 23; wounded, 97; missing, 13; total, 133.

This regiment bore an honorable part in the following engagements :

Tuilahoma Campaign. Tennessee June 23-30, 1863.

Hoover’s Gap, Tennessee June 24-26, 1863.

Chickamauga, Georgia September 19-20, 1863.

Buzzard Roost, Georgia February 25-27, 1864.

Rocky Face Ridge, Georgia May 5-9, 1864.

Resaca, Georgia May 13-16, 1864.

Dallas, Georgia May 25 to June 4, 1864.

New Hope Church, Georgia May 28-30, 1864.

Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, (First Assault) June 23, 1864.

Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, (General Assault) June 27, 1864.

Peach Tree Creek, Georgia, (Hood’s first sortie) July 20, 1864.

Atlanta. Georgia. (Hood’s second sortie) July 22, 1864.

Atlanta, Georgia, (Hood’s third sortie) July 28, 1864.

Atlanta, Georgia, (Siege of) July 28 to September 2, 1864.

Jonesboro, Georgia August 31 to September 1, 1864.

Columbia, Tennessee Noventber 24-28, 1864.

Spring Hill, Tennessee November 29, 1864.

Franklin, Tennessee November 30, 1864.

Nashville. Tennessee – . .December 15-16, 1864.



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