The 19th Light Artillery Battery

The 19th Light Artillery Battery of Indiana – Roster and Detailed History


A Union 6 pound cannon

A 6 pounder. The standard weapon of Union Light Artillery Battries.



The Roster of the 19th Light Artillery Battery


CAPTAIN
Samuel J. Harris,

FIRST LIEUTENANT
Robert S. Lackey

SECOND LIEUTENANTS.
Charles M. Butler, Knightstown. Mustered in April 1, 1863. Resigned September 27, 1863.
John S. Gilbreath, Knightstown. Commissioned March 2, 1865. Not mustered. Mustered out as Sergeant, June 10, 1865.

QUARTERMASTER SERGEANT.
Charles M. Butler, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Promoted Second Lieutenant.

SERGEANT
Henry C. Woods, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Wounded at
Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863. Mustered out June 10, 1865.

CORPORALS.
John S. Gilbreath, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Appointed Sergeant. Promoted Second Lieutenant.
James P. Elder, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.

BUGLER
Aaron M. Gimckle, Spiceland. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out May 29, 1864

ARTIFICERS.
Charles L. Meair, Lewisville. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Discharged, disability, February 26, 1863.
Daniel Elliott, Henry County. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Discharged, disability, March 20, 1863.

PRIVATES.
Oliver Allee, Knightstown. Mustered in January 6, 1864. Captured near Bentonville, North Carolina, March 17, 1865. Paroled. Mustered out June 18, 1865.
William W. Brown, Knightstown. Mustered in October 12, 1864. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
George K. Brownfield, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Died at Chattanooga, Tennessee, September 25, 1863, account of wounds at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863.
Lewis Bunker, Lewisville. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Mathias Burris, Knightstown. Mustered in January 6, 1864. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Shady Childers, Greensboro. Mustered in August 28 ,1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
William H. Dakins, Lewisville. Mustered in April 1, 1864. Recruit. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Francis Dovey, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Wounded in the Atlanta Campaign, July 24, 1864. Mustered out May 25, 1865.
Robert H. Downs, Lewisville. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Captured near Bentonville, North Carolina, March 17, 1865. Paroled. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Samuel Elliott, Knightstown. Mustered in December 31, 1863. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Austin S. Freeman, Cadiz. Mustered in March 19, 1864. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Benjamin S. Hollingsworth, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Henderson O. Hosier, Wayne County. Kennard after the Civil War. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Joseph L. Hubbard, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
William Jamison, Lewisville. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Alexander Jester, Blountsville. Mustered in March 31, 1864. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
James R. Jester, Blountsville. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865. Also said to have served in the regular army after the Civil War. Record is incomplete in this History.
James M. Jones, Knightstown. Mustered in March 19, 1864. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
William R. Jones, Greensboro. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out July 3, 1865.
William Kirman, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
William H. Knight, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
George W. Koons, Dan W^ebster. Mustered in March 31, 1864. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Gamaliel B. Macy, Greensboro. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Discharged, disability, May 17, 1864.
Lambert Macy, Greensboro. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865..
Timothy Mead, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Killed at Perryville, Kentucky, October 8, 1862.
Harriman Morris, Lewisville. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Richard Murphey, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Edenburgh H. Poston, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Died at Louisville, Kentucky, October 29, 1862.
Elihu Powell, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865
Henry H. Saint. Greensboro. Mustered in March 11, 1864. Recruit. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Henry Scott, Knightstown. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Killed at Perryville, Kentucky, October 8, 1862.
John J. Shelton, Knightstown. Mustered in December 31, 1864 Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Henry Taylor, Millville. Mustered in April 6, 1864. Recruit. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Benjamin Waddell, Lewisville. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Died at Danville, Kentucky, November 8, 1862.
Charles M. Waddell, Lewisville. Mustered in August 20. 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Lorenzo D. Waddell, Lewisville. Mustered in August 20, 1862. Mustered out June 10, 1865.
Jabez Wilson. Knightstown. Mustered in January 6, 1864. Recruit. Mustered out June 10, 1865.


A Light Artillery Practice Drill

A Light Artillery Battery at a practice firing drill.



HISTORY OF THE NINETEENTH BATTERY, LIGHT ARTILLERY,
INDIANA VOLUNTEERS.

The Nineteenth Battery of Indiana was organized and mustered into the
service of the United States at Indianapolis on the 5th day of August, 1862, with Samuel J. Harris as Captain. It was sent to Louisville, Kentucky, very shortly after and joined the Army of the Ohio, upon its return to Louisville, at the time of the invasion of Kentucky by General Bragg.

In the campaign against Bragg through Kentucky it was an active participant, moving from Louisville, with its division, under command of General James S. Jackson, it took part in the battle of Perryville, on the 8th of October. In this engagement the battery was sent across the enemy’s right to the left of Chaplin Hills, and posted on the right, on a high level
ridge, from which position it kept up a steady fire against the enemy for three hours and a half. The loss of the battery in this engagement was eighteen. After the battle of Chaplin Hills, or Perryville, the battery moved, with the army, in pursuit of the enemy as far as Crab Orchard, Kentucky. Returning from Crab Orchard by way of Lebanon to Woodsonville, Kentucky, it there remained until December, when it was sent to Glasgow, and from there to Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

While in Kentucky the battery was frequently engaged in severe marches
with the infantry after the forces of the Confederate General, John H. Morgan. The battery reached Murfreesboro after the battle of Stone’s River and was assigned to the Fourth Division of the Fourteenth Army Corps, under command of General Joseph Reynolds, and with it remained until the 24th of June, 1863, when it marched with its division in General Rosecrans’ campaign through Middle Tennessee.

This battery was on the Chickamauga campaign, and during the battle of Chickamauga, was attached to the Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. Colonel Edward A. King, of the Sixty Eighth Indiana, was in command of the brigade, the division was under the command of Major General Joseph J. Reynolds ; Fourteenth Corps, Major General George H. Thomas. The battery crossed the Tennessee River with King’s Brigade, and accompanied the brigade over Sand Mountain, Lookout Mountain, and was with the Fourteenth Corps in all its marching, and bore with it the hardships of the campaign. In the concentrating of the army of General Rosecrans this battery moved with Colonel King’s Brigade from Pond Spring, Georgia, on the afternoon of September 18th, marching all night, and reaching the Chickamauga battlefield about daylight on the morning
of the 19th. General Reynolds, in his report concerning the first day’s engagement at Chickamauga, September 19th, states that his division, to which Colonel King’s Brigade was attached, “was ordered first to take position in line of battle northeast of Glenn’s house, and “while taking this position the division was ordered to advance immediately to McDonald’s and enter into the action then progressing on our left. I at once reported in person to the corps commander, and, in accordance with his instructions, directed the Third Brigade (Turchin’s) to take position southeast of Kelly’s cross-roads. The Second Brigade (King’s) was about leaving the main road to take place on the right of the Third when I met General Palmer in the road, who represented that his command had gained upon the enemy, but was nearly out of ammunition and in great need of assistance to enable him to hold what he had gained, at least until they could replenish ammunition. This, although not the precise position indicated to me for the Second Brigade, was very close to it, and appeared to be a place where it was essential to fill at once, and no other troops were in sight to take the position. Three regiments, under Colonel E. A. King, were therefore ordered in at this point, leaving in my hands one regiment, Seventy Fifth Indiana, and Nineteenth Indiana Battery.

I had just arrived upon the field and found my division would occupy about the center of our line. No reserve force being anywhere apparent, I determined to form one of Nineteenth Indiana Battery and Seventy Fifth Indiana, to which was shortly added another battery, which I found in the road unemployed, and the Ninety Second Illinois (temporarily dismounted). In a short time the Sixth Ohio came from the front and took position near the Nineteenth Indiana Battery to re-supply ammunition.”

This battery saw active service all through the Atlanta Campaign and went
through with “Sherman to the Sea.” After the surrender of Savannah, on the 21st of December, the battery remained in Savannah until January 30, 1865, when it moved with the army in the campaign through the Carolinas. It was engaged at Columbia, South Carolina, and from thence moved through North Carolina to Goldsboro. On the 19th of March, 1865, it participated in the battle of Bentonville.

After the surrender of Johnston’s Army and the close of the war in North
Carolina, the battery marched to Newbern, and thence was sent by steamship to Washington. After its arrival in Washington, D. C, it took part in the grand review of Sherman’s Army, after which it was sent to Indianapolis for muster out.

On the l0th of June, 1865, the battery was mustered out of the United States service, officers and men discharged and returned to their homes.

The State of Indiana has erected a monument to the Nineteenth Indiana
Battery on the Poe Field line west of the Lafayette road, and on the tablet of that battery is the following inscription :

INDIANA’S TRIBUTE TO HER NINETEENTH BATTERY.
Captain Samuel J. Harris, Lieutenant Robert S. Lackey, Commanding.
Second Brigade (King).
Fourth Division (Reynolds).
Fourteenth Corps (Thomas).

Saturday, September 19, 1863, this battery reached Crawfish Springs, at 7
a. m., after an all-night march from Pond Spring; thence moved to vicinity of
Brotherton’s, and about 3 130 p. m. went into action south of the Poe house and west of the Lafayette road, where Captain Harris was wounded. Being flanked on the right, the battery withdrew to the north side of the Poe field, and was there engaged.
Sunday, September 20th, the battery became engaged at 10 a. m. where this monument stands, and was in action here until noon. It was then moved to the south side of Kelly field, a little northwest of where Colonel King’s monument now stands, remaining there until 5 130 p. m., when the battery retired, taking the body of Colonel King on a caisson.
Casualties : Two enlisted men killed ; Captain and fifteen men wounded ; two missing ; aggregate loss, twenty.

Markers have been set up for this battery to indicate several positions occupied by it during he battle of Chickamauga, other than the position in which their monument is placed. One marker is located east of the Lafayette road, just south of the Kelly field, on which is the following inscription:

INDIANA.
Nineteenth Battery (Harris).
Second Brigade (King).
Fourth Division (Reynolds).
Fourteenth Corps (Thomas).
Saturday, September 19, 1863, 4 : 30 p. m.

Also a marker in the Kelly field, near the King monument, bearing the same
inscription excepting as to time. The time being fixed :
“Sunday, September 20, 1863, 12 m. to 5 130 p. m.”

A third marker is placed in the woods west of the Lafayette road, south of
the Poe house, bearing the same inscription as the first, excepting as to the time.
The time being fixed : ”Saturday, September 19, 1863, 12 m. to 4 p. m.”

This Battery bore an honorable part in the following engagements :
Perryville, Kentucky October 8, 1862.
Vaught’s Hill, near Milton, Tennessee March 20, 1863.
Hoover’s Gap, Tennessee June 24, 1863.
Chickamauga, Georgia September 19-20, 1863.
Missionary Ridge, Tennessee November 25, 1863.
Buzzard Roost, Georgia February 25-27, 1864.
Rocky Face Ridge, Georgia May 5-9, 1864.
Resaca, Georgia May 13-16, 1864.
Dallas, Georgia May 25 to June 4, 1864.
Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia June 9-30, 1864.
Peach Tree Creek, Georgia, (Hood’s first sortie) July 20, 1864.
Atlanta, Georgia, (Hood’s second sortie) July 22, 1864.
Atlanta, Georgia, (Hood’s third sortie) July 28, 1864.
Atlanta, Georgia, (Siege of) July 28 to September 2, 1864.
Utoy Creek, Georgia August 5-6, 1864.
Jonesboro, Georgia August 31 to September 1, 1864.
Savannan, Georgia, (Siege of) December 10-21, 1864.
Columbia, Soutn Carolina February 16-17, 1865.
Bentonville, North Carolina March 19-21, 1865.



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